Promoting International Justice Through Art

The flagship projects really are quite unique in giving you a huge amount of responsibility, and autonomy, over something that exists outside of the Cambridge bubble.

Whitney Ching, Engagement Manager from one of CCN’s Michaelmas Flagship Projects, tells us about her experience, and how it helped her land her job at IQVIA

1.   What was CCN hired to do?

The client was a social enterprise in Madrid, launching a new initiative which would sell art produced by the victims of international injustice and use the proceeds to raise awareness of these issues and their outcomes. Our job was to develop the most effective strategy for launching this initiative. Our team did this by researching similar art markets around the world, proposing a framework for pricing the product, and then ultimately creating a market for the client.

2.   What experience did you have before the project?

As an MPhil used to studying Physiology, promoting international justice through art was a completely novel experience. However, I quickly realised that, despite having no experience in business or consultancy, my background gave me a lot of transferable skills in terms of efficient research, problem-solving, etc. It was an interesting opportunity to prove to myself and others that I could apply these skills in a business context. It was surprisingly familiar because, with scientists everyone is someone’s consultant – because no single person is an expert in everything, you often have to provide your expertise to others, and rely on others expertise in return. I found that I could apply this same principle to a very different task.

3.   What did you learn from the project?

CCN really gave me a lot of confidence to go into consultancy, and helped me land a job with IQVIA, a healthcare consultancy firm. I learned a lot about leadership, and at the interview it was extremely useful to be able to talk about the problems my team had to overcome on the flagship project. I also learned a lot from the other members of my team – for instance, one member of my team studied economics and shared a number of useful frameworks to organize my thoughts about the client’s problem, as well as a lot of lingo! It was really useful to bring together lots of different expertise to solve a problem collectively. Aside from that, I learned a lot from our research. I’m a curious person, and started off without any knowledge of how this sort of non-profit organization typically operates, so the experience gave me an insight into this world and the opportunity to learn something new. The client has a lot they can teach you!

4.   What are your plans for the future?

I’ve accepted a job offer from IQVIA, a healthcare consultancy, and will be working from their Tokyo office. Working with CCN was a clear way to demonstrate that I could operate in a business context, as well as employing the technical expertise I have as a result of my academic studies.

5.   What is your message to anyone hoping to apply to this year’s flagship projects?

The flagship projects really are quite unique in giving you a huge amount of responsibility, and autonomy, over something that exists outside of the Cambridge bubble. I would highly recommend the experience.